Most Final Fantasy games are at the very least good. Many are great. Some are masterpieces. Today with this article, we decided to list all the versions of Final Fantasy games and remove the question of How Many Final Fantasy Games Are There from people’s minds. The Japanese fantasy RPGs debuted on the NES in 1987 but became a cultural touchstone in the 90s on Super Nintendo. From there, the series made an incredibly successful jump to 3D on the original PlayStation. After all this, the mainline series of this game started to take more risks, including the elimination of turn-based battles and MMO entries. Let’s begin and tell you that How Many Final Fantasy Games Are There.

Let’s Find Out That How Many Final Fantasy Games are There?

Most of the games have been re-released for several different platforms, many of which have been included in bundled releases. To begin this article on How Many Final Fantasy Games Are There, we first say that the series as a whole is primarily composed of role-playing video games but also includes massively multiplayer online role-playing games, third-person shooters, tower defense games, and tactical role-playing games.

S.No. Versions of Final Fantasy
1. Final Fantasy I
2. Final Fantasy II
3. Final Fantasy III
4. Final Fantasy IV
5. Final Fantasy V
6. Final Fantasy VI
7. Final Fantasy VII
8. Final Fantasy VIII
9. Final Fantasy IX
10. Final Fantasy X
11. Final Fantasy XI
12. Final Fantasy XII
13. Final Fantasy XIII
14. Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn
15. Final Fantasy XV

1. Final Fantasy

While Final Fantasy was somewhat revolutionary at the time in 1987, featuring a relatively large overworld, strategic turn-based combat, and an epic story following four Light Warriors, it has languished in relative obscurity ever since. Remakes of the game have ironed out some of these more glaring frustrations, but they can’t change the fact that, at heart, this is an extremely limited and simplistic take on an RPG.

2. Final Fantasy II

Final Fantasy II wasn’t officially localized until 2002, nearly 25 years after its initial launch on Famicom. Now it’s playable on a myriad of platforms, including Android and iOS. It’s an interesting piece of gaming history for sure, but Final Fantasy II is quite forgettable. It tells a conventional story about taking down a villainous empire, and it’s a fine experience, but Square hadn’t quite found the right formula for Final Fantasy success.

3. Final Fantasy III

In a lot of ways, this was the first Final Fantasy that really felt like, well, Final Fantasy. It introduced the Job system, which allowed players to redefine their party’s character classes to better deal with new scenarios. It also established the tone of what we think of as the classic Final Fantasy narrative, which is to say it involves a vast and mysterious world that physically changes as players deal with NPCs and make their way to a nihilistic end boss whose presence and motives are never fully explained.

4. Final Fantasy IV

No offense to the first three games in the series, but Final Fantasy IV turned the franchise into a juggernaut. Final Fantasy IV ushered in the active time battle era, a system that continued uninterrupted until Final Fantasy X. The introduction of the active time battle system and the new focus on character-driven narratives made Final Fantasy IV feel a huge cut above its predecessors. Final Fantasy IV is the most important entry in the series, and it remains one of the very best.

5. Final Fantasy V

FF5 expands on the Job system, offering more classes to choose from while allowing players to mix and match the skills that belong to each Job. The resulting setup doesn’t technically give you an infinite number of ways to play the game, but it sure seems like it. Despite this immense flexibility, the game’s difficulty level feels exquisitely balanced from start to finish; enemies pose a challenge throughout the quest, yet there’s no scenario that can’t be overcome by the proper party setup.

6. Final Fantasy VI

Far and away from the best mainline Final Fantasy game, 1994’s Final Fantasy VI┬áis an absolute triumph in every sense. Originally released in North America as Final Fantasy 3 (yes, it’s confusing), Final Fantasy 6 was the last 16-bit mainline entry. It featured a stellar cast of more than a dozen characters and ushered in the steampunk-style world design that would carry over to the PlayStation games in the late 90s. This is where high fantasy became the stuff of legend, and magic was replaced by scientific advances and the burgeoning technology from the Second Industrial Revolution.

7. Final Fantasy VII

By far the biggest game in the franchise in terms of its cultural footprint, Final Fantasy 7 exploded the series from cult favorite to global blockbuster. Ironically, the things that made it so popular 20 years ago are the ones that make it feel so profoundly dated today. Its nearly seamless blend of real-time polygons, pre-rendered backgrounds, and computer-generated cutscene footage represented a brilliant example of game developers harnessing technology in new ways to blur the line between games and cinema.

8. Final Fantasy VIII

Final Fantasy 8 might well be the most divisive game to wear the name Final Fantasy, which is really saying something, but its controversial nature speaks to what makes it so remarkable. After the staggering success of FF7, the development team could easily have churned out a carbon copy reiteration of that game to satisfy fans clamoring for more.

9. Final Fantasy IX

FF9 feels rather uneven in places, with a narrative tone that veers wildly between comedy and melodrama. Its underlying play mechanics feel a bit stodgy after the excesses of FF8. Its technical ambitions push the PlayStation beyond its limits, resulting in a sometimes slow and irritating play experience as the hardware wheezes to keep up. Still, it would be churlish to talk down FF9 due to these minor deficiencies.

10. Final Fantasy X

Final Fantasy X is as phenomenal today as it was in 2001. The PlayStation 2 allowed the visuals to move to the next level, making the Asian-inspired lands of Spira and character models look more realistic than ever before. A mostly linear experience, Final Fantasy X has spacious and diverse environments along with dungeons featuring some excellent puzzles. FFX feels in many ways like an evolutionary dead end for the series now, with its unique battle system and fixed camera angles in a 3D world.

11. Final Fantasy XI

Final Fantasy 11 today is practically a different creature altogether from the game that first shipped nearly a decade and a half ago. As you may recall, it’s having launched in 2002 means it predates World of Warcraft. The fact that it’s survived to the present day (at least on PC; the console versions closed down last year) with a loyal player base speaks to its overseers’ flexibility and willingness to reshape the game to roll with the tumultuous evolution of the genre.

12. Final Fantasy XII

The wondrous world of Ivalice in Final Fantasy XII is filled with interesting characters and richly detailed environments. The combat, formally known as the Active Dimension Battle system, was incredibly deep thanks to the gambit system and modified Limit Break system called Quickenings. FF XII is a game that trusts and respects the player in a way you rarely see, especially in a story-driven JRPG. While it may not have the greatest story in the series, much of the main cast exists at the periphery of much larger events.

13. Final Fantasy XIII

Final Fantasy XIII certainly looked the part when it launched on PS3 and Xbox 360 in 2009. The animations were beautiful, the character models were realistic, and the environmental details were fine-tuned. Final Fantasy XIII also brought back the active time battle system, but it felt far more simplified than before. The result was a series of random battles that could almost quite literally be completed by pressing the same button over and over.

14. Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn

A Realm Reborn plays like a love letter to both Final Fantasy and the MMO genre. It’s a lean, accessible game that draws on the best of the format while managing not to feel like yet another World of Warcraft clone. The entire world is steeped in Final Fantasy heritage, with frequent events that reference the franchise’s best moments.

15. Final Fantasy XV

The most recent entry in the mainline series took a lot of risks. We’ll give it that. But it added up to create an experience that felt distinctly un-Final Fantasy-like. The western RPG influence is readily on display. Final Fantasy XV is an open-world action RPG that entirely drops random encounters in favor of a real-time battle system.

Final Words:

Most Final Fantasy games are at the very least good. Many are great. Some are masterpieces. With all that, we have mentioned all the versions of this game in our article, which is very much helpful for those who want to know that how many final fantasy games are there.

Let’s conclude here, and I hope you all love our article on mentioning all the versions of the final fantasy game with a summary of them. Which version of this game do you love the most tell us about it by commenting down below.

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